Top places to see in Morocco? Djemaa El-Fna is the highlight of any visit to Marrakech and one of the top tourist attractions in Morocco. By day this square at the heart of the medina is largely filled with snake charmers and people with monkeys, as well as some of the more common stalls. As the day progresses the entertainments on offer change: the snake charmers depart, and in the afternoon and evening the square becomes more crowded, with story-tellers, magicians, and peddlers of traditional medicines. As dark descends Djemaa El-Fna fills with dozens of food-stalls, and the crowds are at their height.

The most European of all Morocco’s cities, Tangier has a fascinating and slightly debauched role in 20th-century literary history, and this past is what draws many tourists here. This is the city that inspired famous works such as Paul Bowles’ The Sheltering Sky and William Burroughs’ Naked Lunch. Tangier may have been scrubbed up since their day, with the bohemian cafes and louche bars long gone, but you can still catch a whiff of the decadent days gone by.

Another stunning place to visit in Morocco on your next visit is the Dades Valley. This valley runs between the Jebel Sarhro and High Altas mountain ranges and is frequently visited by Globetrotters as it offers spectacular views of the surrounding area. Don’t forget to head to Todra Gorge for the best experience. This is amongst the best places to visit in Morocco. See even more info at Marrakech Desert Tours.

Erg Chebbi, near to Merzouga, is a dramatic 50-kilometre-long series of sand dunes. Reaching up to 150 metres’ height in places and with a width of five kilometres, the large dunes offer a spectacular experience in the Moroccan Sahara. Camel treks through the dunes and to local Berber villages are popular. A historic citadel, the majestic Ait Benhaddou is located close to Ouarzazate. On the edges of the desert, the picturesque UNESCO-listed village has been used as a shooting location for a number of films. Although many previous occupants now live elsewhere, a walk through the maze-like citadel shows how people used to live in the past. The multi-level dwellings, with the lower levels reserved for livestock, and merchants’ homes are all built from mud.

This lovely old palace built by Vizier Si Said is home to a wonderful collection of Berber jewelry in finely worked silver, oil lamps from Taroudant, pottery artifacts, embroidered leather, and marble. There is also a display of Moroccan carpets and an amazing collection of traditional Moroccan door and window frames, which highlight this country’s local architecture styles. For anyone interested in the evolution of North African art and crafts, it’s a lovely place to potter about for a couple of hours. Near the Dar Si Said, the Maison Tiskiwin has a rather wonderful collection of costumes, jewelry, arms, musical instruments, textiles, and furniture (focused on Saharan culture) put together by Dutch art historian Bert Flint. Another branch of the museum is in Agadir. Find even more info at https://www.moroccotravelholidays.com/.